Thomas Stewart (1803-1888)

 

PART 2:

 GAFFEY FAMILY

ANCESTORS’ CHARTS 

(parents of Joan Gaffey):

INDIVIDUAL SUMMARIES

   

Line of Descent to Joan Gaffey

 

Thomas Stewart

(Great Great Grandfather)

Catherine Stewart

Margaret Berryman

Thomas Gaffey

Joan Gaffey

Father Michael STEWART [1]
Mother Anne TIMMINS[2
Birth 1803 (or 1794) in County Louth, Ireland[3]
Convicted Jul 20 1830 in Louth, Ireland[4]
Transported 1831 to Australia (on the Waterloo) (age 27?)[5
Occupation Labourer/Reaper (Ireland)[7]; Farmer (NSW)[8]
Death Jul 16 1888 near Wiseman's Ferry
Burial Jul 18, 1888 in St Joseph's cemetery, Central MacDonald (St. Albans)[6]
   
Marriage Margaret DALEY (1823 in County Louth, Ireland)
Children 

Mary Anne STEWART (b. Mar 1824)

Catherine STEWART (Jun 1825 – 1908), married Tom Berryman, 1844, Leets Vale, Hawkesbury River, NSW

Alleck STEWART (1831 - 1836)

Anne STEWART (b. 1837}

Margaret STEWART (b. 1839)

Thomas STEWART (b. Jul 24 1841)

Elizabeth STEWART (b. 1844)

Peter STEWART (b. Jul 2 1847)

One of the many convict tales in the Williams' family tree is that of Thomas Stewart, an Irish farm labourer and reaper.  Tom was born in John Street, Ardee, in County Louth[9], possibly in 1803, but if you believe his gravestone and death certificate, in 1794.

According to the convict records, Thomas, the son of a stone-mason, was 27 years old when he was convicted, on July 20, 1830, of housebreaking.  It was his second offence and the judge sentenced him to seven years' transportation "beyond the seas".  When Tom set sail in the Waterloo  for Botany Bay, as the fledging settlement was still colloquially known, he left behind a wife, Margaret, and three children, the eldest seven years old and the youngest, Alleck, a mere infant, born after his father had been sent to prison.  He was not to see them again for six years, and young Alleck, never.

On arrival at Port Jackson in May, 1831, Tom was assigned to the Elkins' farm, at Lower Portland Head, near Wiseman's Ferry, on the Hawkesbury River.  He stayed out of trouble while working for Mrs. Elkins, so much so that she gave him a good character reference some years later, when he sought to have his family brought out to Australia to join him.  His application was granted, but too late for young Alleck , who died before he could join his mother and two older sisters for the voyage south on the Thomas Harrison in 1836.

Tom was not a big man, even by the standards of that time: the convict records describe him as being 5ft 3½, with a sallow, pock-pitted complexion, dark brown hair and grey eyes, with a 'blue mark between left forefinger and thumb."  These early records show Tom’s name as “Stuart”, but later ones all favour the “Stewart” spelling.

When Tom gained his freedom, he and Margaret set about farming in the same area of the MacDonald Valley he had worked as a convict.  Over the years, they added another five children to their family.  Farming was obviously a healthy life for them - Tom lived well into his eighties, dying in 1888, just one year after Margaret.  When he died, without leaving a will, his goods and chattels, according to the administrators of his estate, were worth £271, a not inconsiderable sum for that time.

The picturesque MacDonald Valley, near Wiseman's Ferry on the Hawkesbury river, north of Sydney, where the Stewarts settled after Tom earned his freedom.

 

 

 

Tom and his wife were buried in the now abandoned cemetery alongside the ruins of St Joseph's Church in the MacDonald Valley, near St. Albans.  While overgrown, their gravestone (right) was still quite legible more than 100 years later

 

April 2011: The graveyard is part of the church property being restored.  For a look at the work of restoration of St Josephs, check out Steve Kavanagh's website at:

http://stjosephsrestorationstalbans.blogspot.com/

 

 

 

 


[1] Thomas’ NSW death certificate

[2] As above

[3] As above

[4] Convict records – shipping list of the Waterloo

[5] As above

[6] As above

[7] Convict records – shipping list of the Waterloo

[8] Thomas’ NSW death certificate

[9]  Research by Stewart family researcher, Coralie D. Hird.